Public Safety

bike-patrolmen

The Safest Park in Boston

Everyday park users know that Franklin Park is one of the safest in the city, but we all have a responsibility to keep it that way. Help us change the perception of the park as a dangerous place. Spread the word, tell your friends and neighbors about this hidden treasure!

Safety is everyone’s job: Don’t let delinquent behavior damage the park’s reputation. Keep an eye out for negative activities. You’ll find tall, blue emergency phones in a few key areas: the Playstead parking lot along the Zoo’s rear edge; along the loop path by the park benches close to the Golf Clubhouse; and in the American Legion picnic area. Please download and print this list of who to contact¬†when you see something happening in the park. We all need to keep our Eyes on the Park!

Maintenance

A well maintained park feels safe. Call the Park Line (617.635. PARK) to report maintenance needs: full trash barrels, fallen trees or limbs, overgrown paths, excessive litter, broken park benches, and any other problems. You can also report maintenance problems online at http://www.cityofboston.gov/mayor/24/ or by calling the Mayor’s hotline: 617-635-4500.

Policing

We work with police to increase patrols, make sure there’s a quick response to phone calls, and address “quality of life issues” that make park users uncomfortable. To work on public safety issues or report a problem you have witnessed, contact us: mail@franklinparkcoalition.org

Traffic calming

Cars that cut through the park go much faster than the 25-mile an hour speed limit. The rush hour commuters and constant traffic on Circuit Drive threaten pedestrian and bicycle safety. Coalition pressure has brought police speed traps into the park. When you drive through the park, slow down and make the cars behind you slow down!

Take Back the Park

In late fall 2011 an attack on a woman in the park caused an outpouring of support from both police and community members. More than 200 people – moms pushing strollers, dog walkers, joggers, everyday park users, and uniformed officers walked the golf course loop path in the evening after work with flashlights in support of the woman who was attacked and to reclaim the park they love. There has not been a similar incident since.

Print Friendly